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Umbria

Art and Religion
The Basilica of San Francesco d'Assisi
Food and Wine
Nature and Sport

Umbria Excursion and Transfer
Acquasparta
Assisi
Cannara
Collazzone
Corciano
Deruta
Foligno
Gualdo Cattaneo
Gubbio
Magione
Marsciano

 

Massa Martana
Montecastrilli
Montefalco
Montefranco
Norcia
Orvieto
Mediaeval Paciano
Panicale
Perugia
San Gemini
San Venanzo
Scheggino
Spello
Spoleto
Terni
Todi
Torgiano
Vallo di Nera
Valtopina

 

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UMBRIA
Travelling north of Rome we will reach Italy's green heart,to visit towns like ASSISI the mystic city of St.Francis with the Basilica dedicated to the Saint (1228-1253 with paintings of Cimabue and Giotto). We will conclude the Umbria tour in ORVIETO which has a Cathedral considered the most beautiful in Italy and a masterpiece of medieval architecture from the 14th Century (Maietani, Pisano, Federighi). On request and during the season truffle- tasting.
 
Art and Religion
Umbria land of mysticism and religion, where the lives of saints important, as St. Francis and St. Clare of Assisi, Saint Rita of Cascia, merge into a huge artistic and architectural heritage that is among the most valuable and representative of our country. Land of artists like Giotto, Perugino, the Pintoricchio, who have made valuable impressive churches (like the Basilica di San Francesco in Assisi ...), a land of enchanting medieval villages, perched on the hills, fortified city, surrounded by greenery and ruins Etruscan-Roman, full of stories to tell.
 
The Basilica of San Francesco d'Assisi
Is an important place in the Christian faith and a point of Christian pilgrimage. It is the burial place of St Francis and the mother church of the Franciscan Order. The basilica is a memorial to the man who renounced his wealth and preached and lived a simple life of poverty, abstinence, and renunciation of worldly goods in search of greater spirituality.
The building itself is a World Heritage Site and is comprised of two churches known as the Upper Church and the Lower Church. The interior of the Upper Church is an excellent example of Italian Gothic and the range of artwork offers a unique timeline of Italian art of this period. Among the most important pieces in the basilica is the fresco, characteristic of Italian church architecture. The earliest frescoes are some of those in the Lower Church. Artists like Cimabue, Giotto, Simone Martini, Pietro Lorenzetti and possibly Pietro Cavallini contributed to the church.
The creator of this grand memorial was Francis's right-hand men, the Cortonan disciple Brother Elia. Unlike Francis, Elia was much more worldly than Francis and was responsible for the marketing and promotion of the Franciscan order.
 
Food and Wine
Umbria land of ancient and authentic flavors, be driving the streets of wine or oil, come and taste the prized Sagrantino di Montefalco, the DOC Assisi, the Torgiano Rosso, the precious extra virgin olive oil, the true gold of 'Umbria, the tasty black truffle of Norcia, the tasty fish of the lake. If you are looking for places where the pleasures of nature and art merge with
authentic flavors of the table are in the right direction.
 
Nature and Sport
Umbria Green Heart of Italy: land by glimpses unforgettable landscape, where the mild climate, the presence of fresh and green hills, mountains, forested valleys and make it one of the most picturesque and spectacular of the Italian territory. In Umbria, you can visit the disruptive Niagara Falls, the oasis of nature or of Alviano Colfiorito, now protected area, or have fun doing trekking equipment in parks, kite surfing on Lake Trasimeno, rafting along the rivers.
 
Umbria Excursion and Transfer
 
Acquasparta
Acquasparta is an ancient medieval village situated in Umbria in central Italy. Set on a hill above the Naia Valley and Naia River, the Monti Martani mountain range looms overhead. The town is also situated between two hot springs, the Amerino and the Furipane.
The town's proximity to Rome led to many buildings being put up at that time and much wealth in trade. The town's historical center was once surrounded by medieval walls to protect its goods, but now most of the walls have been torn down. Luckily, many Roman ruins remain including other portions of the city's defense like cylindrical towers. There are also Roman thermal baths which are open to the public daily.
 
Assisi
Assisi is a town and episcopal see in Italy in Perugia province, in the Umbria region, on the western flank of Mt. Subasio. Assisi is a perfect Umbrian hill town. It's a tiered, village of pink and pale-gray stone drawn out along a mountainside and surrounded by a valley patchwork of fields and olive groves. It was the birthplace of St. Francis, who founded the Franciscan religious order here in 1208, and St. Clare (Chiara d'Offreducci), the founder of the Poor Clares. Saint Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows of the 19th century was also born here. It boasts Roman roots, a glowering castle and twisting alleyways from the Middle Ages, and some of Italy's finest early Renaissance art -- all backed by the brilliant green slope of sacred Mt. Subasio. Assisi is still one of Italy's top sights, ranking with the Colosseum, Pompeii, and Venice's canals
Bevagna is a town in touch with its past. Roman ruins and walls make up the backbone of the city with modern amenities finding their place within the existing framework. The city lies in the Italian province of Perugia in Umbria. Settled into the flood plain of the Topino River, the medieval town has a population of about 2,500 with another 2,500 in the outlying area. The Roman history can be felt in the many mosaics around town, the remains of a Roman theatre and of two Roman temples, and the medieval churches scattered around town.
 
Cannara
Cannara sits in the floodplain in central Umbria in the province of Perugia. The flood waters of the Topino have resulted in a fertile plain of agricultural wealth. The town itself is made up of agricultural industry, growing wheat and onions. Onion is the area's prize crop; it grows easily in the clay-like soil, rich in silica. The town's railroad station isn't for passengers, but for produce. Outside of the cultivated crops, the area is rich in olive trees, vineyards, chestnuts and oaks.
Cannara is also an interesting place for those interested in St. Francis. Born in nearby Assisi, he is thought to have instituted the Third Order, and Pian d' Arca is credited as the site where he preached to the birds. The story is that Francisco crossed the land announcing the Gospel and stopped in Cannara to preach. People remained touched from the words of the friar and wished to behave themselves in the fidelity to the Gospel and to follow it. Many churches, monuments, and sacred places are scattered around in response to this happening.
In the Italian province of Perugia near the Corno River is the town of Cascia. Founded in Roman times, this somewhat remote town has suffered several misfortunes which have robbed it of Roman remains. The effects of barbaric tribes and earthquakes are in what structures they have taken away. Luckily, Cascia's primary focus is not a structure, but a story. The town is the home of Saint Rita, who was born in 1381 and died in Cascia in 1457. Rita was canonized in 1900 and a large shrine was built in the town. This remains an important place of pilgrimage, as well as the house where she was born.
 
Collazzone
Collazzone sits atop a hill in the Umbrian section of Italy. Overlooking the central part of the Tiber Valley, the area is rich in oaks, pines and olive trees. Once known as Colle di Attone, the name was later corrected to Collazzone. The town has preserved some of its military features of mediaeval walls, ramparts, and buttressed embattled towers. The people are also remarkable for their warm and friendly attitude and simply delicious cuisine.
 
Corciano
Corciano lies within the Province of Perugia in the Italian region of Umbria. According to an ancient legend, Corciano owes it name and its origins to Coragino, a mythical friend of Ulysses. The town's Etruscan-Roman origins are documented from the discovery of a small Etruscan necropolis and numerous other findings located at its municipal offices. The town is a peaceful and beautiful walled medieval town, overlooking the modern amenities of a busy highway that carries travelers to nearby Magione, Passignano and Tuoro sul Trasimeno.
 
Deruta
Deruta lies just 19 km south of Perugia and is close to Togiano and Marsciano, but stands out from its neighbours because of its reputation for beautiful pottery. The town has a distinguished history of maiolica manufacturing and notable ceramics. The town's products are known and exported worldwide. The traditions and customs associated with the crafts of these pieces continues as it is encouraged by a government-sponsored ceramics laboratory and training school. What is less well-known about Deruta is that the area itself is also lovely. The Tiber River flows through hilly Deruta to Rome. The streets and buildings are attractively medieval, with parts of the ancient castle remaining. Portions of the wall, the arches of the three doors to the city and the characteristic medieval streets all allude to the town's earlier past.
 
Foligno
Foligno (Latin: Fulginiae, Fulginium) is an ancient town of Italy in the province of Perugia in east central Umbria, on the Topino river where it leaves the Apennines and enters the wide plain of the Clitunno river system. It is located 40 km (25 mi) south-east of Perugia, 10 km (6 mi) north-north-west of Trevi and 6 km (4 mi) south of Spello.
Foligno is one of the very few Umbrian cities built in the plain. It rises up on the banks of Topino River where the river erupts into the valley in an area where extensive drainage of the large swamplands took place, first during Roman times, then during the 15th and 16th centuries and finally in the 19th century.
The historical center of Foligno is traditionally divided into twenty rioni ("quarters"). Only ten of them are officially reckoned and can take part to the Giostra della Quintana. These are:
• Ammanniti
• Badia
• Cassero
• Contrastanga
• Croce Bianca
• Giotti
• La Mora
• Morlupo
• Pugilli
• Spada
The “dead” rioni which had been absorbed within the former ones are: Borgo, Fonte del Campo, Cipischi, Croce, Falconi, Feldenghi, Franceschi, Menacoda, Piazza Vecchia, and Spavagli.
 
Gualdo Cattaneo
Gualdo Cattaneo is a small town in the Colli Martani Mountains of central Umbria. The name Gualdo derives from “wald” selva which refers to the wealth of forests surrounding the area. One of the symbols of the town, a mighty cylindrical tower, sits in the main square. It was built in 1494 and is attached to the Saint Michael Church with a facade adorned with reliefs depicting the Lamb with mystical symbols of the four evangelists. The ancient castle of the same name rises up on the north-western side of the city.
 
Gubbio
Gubbio is located on Mount Ingino, a mountain in the Apennines, in the northeastern part of Perugia. It is one of the most ancient towns of Umbria with beautiful Medieval-style construction and Gothic buildings. The homes in Gubbio are from ancient-style designs with unique rooftops. Many of the homes were constructed around the 14th and 15th centuries and originally inhabited by wealthy merchants. The town is also notable as the home of the world's second largest standing roman theatre. The Middle Ages does not seem so long ago when walking the ancient streets and observing the friendly family atmosphere of the small town.
Gubbio bubbles with activity. Fascinating events like crossbow competitions, theatrical performances, and carnivals taking place year round. The town is a source of tremendous historical value and a truly fun place to visit.
 
Magione
Magione is a small town in west central Umbria. Its name derives from the French maison, “house”. The house in this case was that of the Knights Templar, a massive fortress on the top of the hill. To this day, the castle is property of a knightly order, the Sovereign Order of Malta, to which any application to visit must be made, since it is not normally open to the public.
There once was a massive lake in the area and the town thrived on the fishing industry. Over the years, the lake has dried up and now the town has shifted to light industry. Magione is famous among medieval specialists as the home of Giovanni da Pian del Carpine, a Franciscan monk who traveled to the court of the Great Khan of the Tatars a quarter century before Marco Polo. He wrote a book about it, the Historia Mongolorum, which for the first time described the Mongolian civilization, a text used as a guide by many missionaries and merchants.
 
Marsciano
Marsciano (formerly called Monregio or Monreale) is in the Province of Perugia in the Italian region of Umbria. A larger town on the western edge of the floodplain of the Tiber, Marsciano is an industrial center. The main industry is concerned with brick-making, complete with a museum of brick making and terracotta.
Outside of the man-made, Marsciano has lovely woods of oaks which co-exist with the maquis and cultivated fields of grapevines, olive trees, sunflowers and wheat. The valley is uncontaminated and offers water games, smooth stones and the waterside vegetation. The views from around the village are reminiscent of paintings by Umbrian artists of the 400's.
Another notable feature is the hospitality of the people. The town is full of celebrations every summer. The people's craftsmanship, including production of the loom-manufactured tissues bearing ancient Umbrian designs or in the knitwear made of high-quality yarns, draw visitors.
 
Massa Martana
Massa Martana this small town is one of the classic walled towns of central Italy. The town lies on the on the west flank of the Colli Martani, a low ridge of hills forming the backbone of central Umbria. The modern town has spread northwards following the SS 316, a road that more or less follows the west branch of the Roman road “Via Flaminia” though some of Italy's most beautiful countryside.
The tiny core of the city is still enclosed within walls, complete with a main gate that is inscribed with several ancient inscriptions. The people living within the center are exceptionally proud of their well-preserved hamlet and pleased when others appreciate it. The pace of life is slow and sense of community strong.
Outside the walls are the Martani Mountains and rich Mediterranean forest. The region produces many specialties, like Nociata- the only nougat produced in Umbria. There is also a local wine -Doc “Colli Martani”, an extra virgin olive oil -Dop “Colli Martani”, and specialty sausages, hams, porchetta, truffles, and asparagus
 
Montecastrilli
Montecastrilli, (sometimes spelled in two words), is very characteristic of a walled hilltop village in Umbria. The city retains its original character of a fortified medieval hamlet. Situated on a hill that inspired its heraldic coat of arms, the area comprises five smaller villages: Castel dell'Aquila, Castel Todino, Farnetta, Quadrelli and Collesecco.
Tradition states that Montecastrilli draws its name from the “castra” (encampments) planted by Hannibal's army marching to Rome. The town is now more famous for its high-quality production of olive oil and wine. The area is also known for the “quercus frainetto”, or oak which grow in the territory of Montecastrilli. The trees have leaves 20 centimeters in length and are threatened because of their slow growth. The oak are responsible for the name of Farnetta
 
Montefalco
Montefalco is often referred to within Italy as the “la ringhiera dell'Umbria” which translates to “the balcony of Umbria”. A majestic hill town in central Umbria, Montefalco is on the eastern side of the Colli Martani Mountains.
Surrounded by ancient walls, Montefalco's streets are at a slant to the top of the hill and the center of town. Walking the streets, visitors can think of the famous local artists that called Montefalco home like Perugino, Giovanni di Corraduccio and Tiberio d'Assisi who designed the interior of the church. At least eight saints have also called Montefalco their birthplace. From the top of the hill, panoramic views of the Umbria valley may be enjoyed. Beautiful olive groves and vineyards hint at Montefalco's specialties. The town in known for its delectable Sagrantino, Passito, and Secco wines
 
Montefranco
Montefranco is one of the smallest comuni of Umbria. It is only 10 km2 in area. The town grew from its defensive position defending the right bank of the Nera River. The castle and town have undergone long-time ruling by nearby Spoleto, and have also suffered various occupations. The town obtained communal liberty in 1258, after occupations from Ottone IV in 1209 under the jurisdiction of the Church.
Montefranco is as picturesque as the views it offers from it hilltop location. It is surrounded by olive groves and woods of oaks and pines. Below it, in the valley, the River Nera flows. Intense green vibrates from the valley.
The effects of civilization are equally hard to miss. Montefranco is a rustic village that constantly hints at its medieval center. The streets, architecture, and people are all to be enjoyed.
 
Norcia
Norcia is a town and commune in the province of Perugia (Italy) in southeastern Umbria, located in a wide plain abutting the Monti Sibillini, a sub range of the Apennines with some of its highest peaks, near the Sordo River, a small stream that eventually flows into the Nera. The town is thus popularly associated with the Valnerina (the valley of that river).
The area is known for its air and scenery, and is a base for mountaineering and hiking. It is also widely known for hunting, especially of the wild boar, and for sausages and ham made from wild boar and pork, to the point that Norcia has given its name to such products: in Italian, norcineria.
 
Orvieto
Orvieto is a city in southwestern Umbria, situated on the flat summit of a large butte of volcanic tuff. The site of the city is among the most dramatic in Europe, rising above the almost-vertical faces of tufa cliffs that are completed by defensive walls built of the same stone.
Orvieto is at an elevation of 1000 feet while the valley lies at 360 feet. There are 10,000 people who live in the city itself and another 15,000 in the valley and in the surrounding hills.
Those who lived on the top of this high plateau dug this hidden labyrinth left unaltered over the past 2500 years; it is an invaluable reservoir of historical and archeological information which has only recently been the object of organic scientific studies.
The city of Orvieto has adapted to the needs of the modern day tourist by transforming itself into a car-free haven. Access to the city in fact is either via the funicular that runs from the railway station below up to the old town centre, passing directly by the Albornoz fortress, or up the system of escalators dug into the Cliffside from the large parking lot at Campo della Fiera. Alternatively there is a regular minibus service that covers the entire city.
Although Orvieto enjoys a pleasant climate all year round, the best time to tour the city is certainly between the end of winter in February or March and the beginning of autumn in October.
 
Mediaeval Paciano
Mediaeval Paciano sits on Monte Petrarvella in the Umbria region of Italy. Its name, originally written as Paciano until the seventeenth century, refers to the family Pacci of Cortona. The town holds attractive mediaeval streets, a circuit of walls, and several interesting late mediaeval and Renaissance churches. The 13th century city plan opens fanlike, including the surrounding walls and three arched gates and towers. Paciano is one of the most beautiful and well-preserved medieval villages in the countryside.
The nature is rich around the town, featuring Mediterranean wildlife. From its hilltops, an eagle's-eye view takes in three lakes: those of Trasimeno, Chiusi and Montepulciano. Closer at hand are the town's groves of olives, vineyards, and fruit orchards. Handcrafts are also very important and old skills are put to use. Tourism is an also an important feature of the economy with those eager to get a glimpse into “old Italy”.
Panicale, located in Umbria, this medieval hill town features some beautiful old architecture and an unusual city plan. The streets are arranged in an oval pattern which radiate out from the main square and tend to be quite steep. Panicale was formerly a military bulwark of great importance and the remaining city wall, fortified doors, and towers all lend to the medieval feel of the town.
 
Panicale
Panicale is on a natural terrace overlooking Lake Trasimeno and the broad valley of the River Nestor. Its position offers magnificent views in a peaceful setting. Also, painter Masolino da Panicale once lived here.
 
Perugia
Perugia is the capital city in the region of Umbria near the Tiber river, and the capital of the province of Perugia. It lies on a hill between the Trasimenian Sea and the Tiber valley. The town is worth visiting not only for the beauty of its setting but also for its fine old buildings. It is the seat of an archbishop and a university town, with a University for Foreigners. Perugia is also renowned as the principal center of the Umbrian school of painting, the leading members of which, Pietro Vannucci, called Perugino (1446-1523), and Bernardino Betti, called Pinturicchio (1455-1513), both worked here. The young Raphael worked in Perugino's studio until 1504.
 
San Gemini
San Gemini, originally a pre-roman town called Casventum, was renamed in the 9th century when a monk called Gemine from Syria began to preach there. The monk did so much good that the town became known as the city of “Saint Gemine”. Along with a name from long ago, the town is a well-preserved medieval city with two lines of walls, built over the remains of a small Roman center along the old Via Flaminia.
San Gemini is renowned for its mineral waters. Baths whose mineral waters take the town's name are important to San Gemini's prominence and are the reason for many of the town's visitors.
 
San Venanzo
San Venanzo sits amid the rich nature of wooded areas and flowering plains. Near Monte Peglia, San Venanzo is of medieval origins and in the Umbria region of Italy. It was built near some very early Roman towns which were just discovered in 1999. Like many villages of the Orvietano region, the agricultural and wood centers are of great importance to the town. In the last few years San Venanzo has also developed a flourishing handicraft market in the area of terracotta.
The area is of geological interest, since it is the only volcanic outcrop anywhere in Umbria. The type of volcanic rock, mineral venanzite, is a form of lava used in the construction industry and fairly unique.
 
Scheggino
Scheggino is in Umbria near the Nera and Fonti di Valcasana Rivers. The town has walls from the 12 century and lovely ancient architecture, but its best feature lies outside the walls in the rivers running along it. The water of the area is crystal clear giving Scheggino a character quite unique from much of Umbria.
The town has ancient origins and was first known as Schiaginum then Schezzino. Later, the name Scheggino was recognized and the town became an agricultural centre. The town rose around a triangular castle from which the primitive structure is still visible. The locality was fenced with wall to protect its assets, but was occasionally attacked.
Along the left side of the Nera lies an enchanting glimpse into the essence of Scheggino. There is a spring between the trees known as the “Valcasana fountains”. Natural delights abound from these lovely waters to green hills.
 
Spello
Spello, once called “Hispellum”, is an ancient town in central Italy. The old walled town lies on a sloping ridge which meets the plain. From the top of the ridge, Spello commands a good view of the Umbrian plain towards Perugia. The more modern section of town runs along the bottom of the ridge and into the plain. The densely-inhabited town is built of stone and retains a medieval aspect and is enclosed in a circuit of medieval walls on Roman foundations.
Although not on the usual tourist route, Spello has a wonderful atmosphere to enjoy. It is a town of locals and gives a view of the “real” Italy. Giulio Urbini, an Umbrian art historian, praised the city with a section in his book entitled “Spello”
 
Spoleto
Spoleto is an ancient city in the Italian province of Perugia in east central Umbria on a foothill of the Apennines. This is an outstanding city, built on a hill with remains from Roman times but with the general appearance of a mediaeval town an attractive destination all-year-round, a peaceful hilltown with a fine cathedral, interesting sights and pleasant walks. But it is during June and July that Spoleto comes to life. The Festival dei Due Mondi (Festival of Two Worlds) takes over the historic town centre, with high-quality performing arts events taking place throughout Spoleto. Churches, piazzas and theatres are turned into festival venues, the streets are packed with people.
 
Terni
Terni is a modern town, characterised by regular wide streets lined with trees, which make us understand the typical Roman plan based on the “Cardo” and the “Decumano”; among the buildings standing along the principal streets many were rebuilt in the post-war period, while some are decidedly more ancient. The centre of the town, rather pleasant, reveals surprising corners where interesting remains of the past recall other ages and different lifestyles.
 
Todi
Todi is a town in Umbria in central Italy. Situated upon a two-crested hill, the beautiful ancient architecture of the area also has lovely views of the river Tiber and surrounding areas. The city is enclosed within three concentric walls which once protected the oldest area of the city. The walls tell some of the long history of the town. The innermost walls were built by its first settlers, the next walls were put there by the Romans, and the outer wall was built in medieval times.
The city itself is built upon whole huge ancient Roman cisterns with more than 500 pits. The cisterns were in use until 1925. In a 17th century a census about castles, fortresses and mansions, the Commune of Todi was rated highly with 365 notable structures. A plethora of ruins and 37 intact buildings can be enjoyed in and around the town.
 
Torgiano
Torgiano lies in the Umbria region of Italy. Originally an Etruscan enclave and later a Roman fort, the town sits atop a hill above the Tiber and Chiàscio River. The town is positioned defensively with the ancient part of town still partly surrounded by medieval walls. The fortifications are common to the Umbrian defense structures of the XIII and XIV centuries and fit the landscape for maximum security. The passageways dug into the banks of the compact sandstone and consolidated clay can still be found running underground. These same passageways are now commonly used as wine cellars for the houses and other structures of the town. Of the structures that have been preserved, the Guard Tower is most visible.
Torgiano is fairly small, but the sweeping views of the vineyard-filled valleys are worth visiting. The cultivation of wine is an ancient art, with archeologists finds discovering tools dating back to the 14th century. The zone is characterized by agriculture, consisting in the cultivation of olive oil, lace and embroidery, and above all, the terracotta pottery trade.
 
Vallo di Nera
Vallo di Nera has been designated as one of the most beautiful hilltop villages in the whole of Italy. It is entirely surrounded by walls, with towers and gateways dating from the feudal rule of Corrado di Spoleto. In Italian, the name translates to “black wall”, but what one finds here are Renaissance frescoes and medieval urban structures with narrow alleys topped by arches. Small churches dot the valley walking through the rolling hills to nearby villages is enjoyable.
Throughout the year, local village festivals filled with music, dance and delicious local Umbrian food take place. Val di Nera is within easy access of Spoleto, Norcia, Castelluccio and the Monte Sibillini National Park.
 
Valtopina
Valtopina is a small town on the west bank of Topino River. The town's location to the river is responsible for its name. In Roman times, this point of the Topino gorge was where the Via Flaminia ran. In the latter part of the 20th century, a superhighway version of that same road was built on the east side of the river bypassing the town. This slowed down life in Valtopina, but the natural beauty of the area and the positive nature of the town make it worth visiting.
The Commune of Valtopina is considered geographically at one with the hamlets of Giove, Sasso, Gallano, Pasano, Casa Tommaso, Serra, Balciano, Colfulignato, Vallemare, Poggio, S. Cristina, and Franchillo. Valtopina is the only town to occupy the valley bottom. The terrain is fairly hilly with deciduous and pine woods adding to the picturesque nature of the area.
 
   

 

 

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